Community Plans

Ferndale Master Plan Update

Master Plan Market Studies

City Council, Planning Commission, and staff are proud to present an update to the City’s Master Plan with consultants from Hamilton Anderson Associates. The plan update sets a common vision, goals, and actions for where the City should direct its efforts over the next five to ten years. Key sections of the plan include land use, housing and neighborhoods, economic vitality, recreation and open space, transportation and mobility, and city services, facilities, and infrastructure.

The Master Plan update is different from past plans created by the City for several reasons. The 2008 Ferndale Master Plan set a strong framework for today’s draft plan in setting a vision, a thorough assessment of existing conditions, and implementation steps. The Master Plan update includes all three of those elements, but increases the focus on implementation. There are over 100 action items noted throughout the plan and summarized with key task leaders to carry out action items. Sustainability was a driving principle in every section of the plan and tied to the referenced action items. Community engagement casted a wider net than previous plans through online feedback, a public open house, and focus groups. The plan also includes specific sub-district market studies (downtown and industrial) to get a better understanding of retail, housing, and office demand.

The Master Plan is available for download at the link above and a physical copy is available for review at City Hall (300 E. Nine Mile Road). For more details, please contact the Community and Economic Development Department at ced@ferndalemi.gov.

2008 Master Plan

The City's 2008 master plan is the current guide for community decision makers, until the updated master plan is adopted (likely early 2017). It was developed through public participation in a series of community meetings with the Community Economic Development staff, the Planning Commission, and other elected bodies. The plan became a statement of a community’s vision for its own future and a road map that provides direction to achieve that vision. The view of the future prescribed in the Master Plan was shaped by the community's values, vision for the future, and ideals for the best management of our parks, green spaces, infrastructure, and man-made environments.

The Community and Economic Development Department makes recommendations to the Planning Commission based on the community's feedback, as documented in the Master Plan. Successful implementation of the Master Plan should help to achieve the standards of quality of life set forth by the public and their elected officials.

FYE 2017-2021 Draft CIP Plan

The 2017-2021 Capital Improvement Program is a five-year expenditure plan that provides the City with a financial strategy to support vital infrastructure improvements and major investments. Proposed fiscal year 2017-2018 capital expenditures are expected to be about

$10.8 million. Of that, $2.1 million are expected to support general fund activities, $6 million will support street and park improvement bond projects, $1.8 million will support water and sanitation infrastructure, and an additional $1 million is expected to be applied as a bond payment from the Auto Parking Fund toward the City’s first parking development.  A Story Map summarizing the plan and these highlights can be viewed here.  

2017 Parks and Recreation Master Plan Update

City Council, Parks and Recreation Commission, and Ferndale Parks and Recreation & Department of Public Works staff are proud to present an update to the City’s Parks and Recreation Master Plan with consultants from Hamilton Anderson Associates. Communities are required by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment (DNRE) to update their Plan every 5 years to be eligible for grant funds.

The Parks and Recreation Master Plan is the document that sets the vision and action plans for realizing the full potential of Ferndale’s parks and recreation services and facilities now and into the future. Key sections of the plan include facilities and program inventories, communications, partnerships, maintenance and operations, and funding.

The Parks and Recreation Master Plan is available for download at the link above and physical copies are available for review at City Hall (300 E. Nine Mile Road) and Kulick Community Center (1201 Livernois). For more details, please contact the Parks and Recreation Department or Community and Economic Development office at ced@ferndalemi.gov.

2010-2015 Parks and Recreation Master Plan

The 2010 - 2015 Recreation Plan provided direction to City Staff in the development of our parks and outdoor recreation facilities and made the City eligible for previous grant funds.  

FerndaleMoves.com is a one stop shop for all walking, biking, and transportation related projects in the City of Ferndale.  Residents and visitors can now stay up to date with the latest news, updates and even provide comment on all current and future transportation and transit projects. The site is interactive and is designed to be a platform for civic engagement. The public process must be balanced, open, and collaborative in order to create plans that define the community’s needs and elicits its support.

Subarea plans

Subarea plans are prepared for limited geographic areas within a community. These can be neighborhoods, corridors, the downtown, or special districts. Subarea plans generally include a greater level of detail than our Master Plan. Any special plan needs to be considered within the context of the community as a whole.

Sustainability Plans

During 2012, the City of Ferndale partnered with Oakland County and the other Woodward 5 communities on a sustainability plan that includes similar measures for each city.  Essentially, the sustainability plan is designed to help the cities focus on the triple bottom line:  Polices and practices that have a positive net impact on the long-term socialeconomic, and environmental health of the community.

The City of Ferndale, along with several other local municipalities annually enters into the Michigan Green Communities Challenge.  The MGCC serves as a guide for communities to measure their progress toward successful sustainability, encourage productive competition between Michigan communities, provides a framework for peer-to-peer benchmarking, and recognizes communities for their sustainability accomplishments.